Moving Day – Embrace the Change

by | Nov 10, 2016 | Change | 0 comments

My in-laws recently moved out of the house they’d lived in for nearly 50 years. After months of sorting, packing, offloading and many late nights, they now enjoy life in a new community.

Their ordeal brought back memories of my own moving experiences. Cheryl and I have moved 11 times (twice internationally) in 27 years, including a stretch of nine moves in 13 years—about once every 17 months. 

Moving disrupts the most important things in our livesThere’s no escaping the fact that moving is exhausting, emotionally and physically. It rattles everything in life: Relationships, work, sleep, finances … they all get hit. I usually take what “they” say with a grain of salt, but in this case “they” are right: It’s one of life’s most stressful events.

On the plus side, moving can teach you a lot about yourself. You find your limits. You learn not to hold on too tightly to stuff (something about moving a box and realizing it’s been two moves since you last opened it).

It also forces us to adapt, because it demands a change. We are creatures of habit, hard-wired for pattern, routine, order and rhythm. Some habits are good while others work against us. But here’s the key: Most of the time we aren’t even aware our habits are so, uh … habitual. Until they get disrupted and exposed, and we feel like a fish out of water.

So what if we could adapt without having to go through the effort of a move?

Most of the time we aren’t even aware our habits are so, uh … habitual. Until they get disrupted, and we feel like a fish out of water.

“And Your Point Is…?”

Most personal and professional development comes down to two things:

  1. Becoming aware of your habits, and
  2. Having the will to change the ones that are working against you

So What?

Awareness begins with admitting that you have habits—a hard step for many to take. Once you’re convinced habits exist, it’s much easier to identify them. You can start by asking those closest to you about what habits they’ve seen (without reacting or getting defensive).

Changing the bad habits is more complex, but you can start by calling them what they are: habits (meaning, they are not absolutes; they can change). If you don’t take this step, nothing else you do will matter much.

The Big Picture

You can’t successfully navigate change unless you embrace the dynamics of change, which includes not holding on to “stuff” (whatever that may be for you) longer than you need to be effective.

…you can start by calling them what they are: habits (meaning, they are not absolutes; they can change). If you don’t take this step, nothing else you do will matter much.

 

Question: Where will you begin to identify your habits?

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